Warner Bros TV Production UK will use Project Parking for media management

Greg Light, senior edit assistant, Warner Bros
Neal Romanek
Post Production
January 26th 2016 at 12:50PM : By Neal Romanek

Warner Bros UK will use the software by Marquis Broadcast to manage Avid projects on its 250TB EditShare and 96TB Isis storage

Warner Bros Television Production UK has chosen Marquis Broadcast to manage its media projects.

It will use Marquis’ archive and retrieve solution, Project Parking, which was developed to be a complete Avid storage management solution.

Based in London, Warner Bros UK is an internal post house for a number of production companies, including Wall to Wall, Twenty Twenty, Ricochet and Renegade, outputting content from long-running brands to one-off specials and features.

It plans to use Project Parking to manage the Avid projects on its 250TB EditShare and 96TB Isis storage.

Marquis, a content workflows and media integration software company, specialises in moving media.

With the ever increasing demands to use more media, there is a growing need for organisations to optimise shared storage resources, and Project Parking offers an intuitive toolset to analyse and manage media to optimise shared storage utilisation,” said Chris Steele, managing director, Marquis Broadcast.

“In a single application, the solution analyses all Avid projects and media to identify which projects are using up most space and take appropriate action to transfer, archive or delete. By taking care of the technical knowhow, Marquis enables end users to focus on the important task of creativity.”

Simon Brett, technical manager at Warner Bros UK, said, “Projects span multiple workspaces and having a clear, top-down view of those spaces is essential for media management as well as archiving Avid projects internally or between storage or sharing Avid projects externally.”

“Project Parking is also being used to allow projects started on EditShare, to be moved over to Avid Isis storage with the goal of lowering the cost of nearline storage.”